4 Reasons Why You Should Focus On Small Music Blogs…Not Big Ones [Sonicbids]

By Shivani Patel

Everyone wants major press placements. I get it. There’s a lot of clout that comes with a feature on Alternative Press, Stereogum, Consequence of Sound, etc. However, in their quest to shoot straight to the top, emerging bands are missing a vital component to career growth: small, indie blogs.

There are a lot of reasons that your band might not be ready for a major outlet to take notice, thus eliminating it from your options completely. The first step in all of this is to really accept that. Know that you’ll get there one day, but today might not be that day, and that’s okay. Now, let’s talk about why small music blogs can be a major component to your success.

1. They’re easier to get in touch with

This is pretty important, right? If you can’t get in touch with someone, that pretty much eliminates your chances at a feature. I want to be clear that unless you’re being very personal and specific in your pitch and have put some effort into building relationships, it doesn’t matter who you reach out to, you probably won’t get a response. But assuming you’ve done a bit of work, being able to actually get in touch with a blog is going to be your first leg up.

2. They’ll push your music much harder than large outlets

Smaller outlets will almost always push your music much harder than their larger counterparts. I don’t know why exactly this is, especially since independent blogs make little-to-no money, but it is a fact I have come across time and time again since entering the music industry in 2009.

When I say they’ll push your music harder, I mean it in every sense. They’re apt to offer more feature opportunities, including longer form features such as interviews and in-depth reviews. (When was the last time you saw a lengthy feature on an unknown band in a major outlet?) Once that’s published, you can bet they’ll be pushing it all over their social media and tagging you, thus offering even more exposure to the piece. (By the way, you should do the same when you receive coverage.)

3. Their audiences are fiercely loyal

They take everything to heart, and they look forward to the features that make that blog unique, including their spotlights on emerging acts. Because small blogs tend to post more emerging artist features than anything else, their readers expect it and they look forward to it. They’re there because they want to discover new music, not just because they want to keep up with the latest on the bands they already know. Readers of small blogs tend to take writer’s recommendations to heart, and because of that, they’re a lot more likely to stop and listen to your music rather than scroll past.

4. You grow together

I’m a huge advocate of the theory that if we stick together, we grow together. This is especially relevant when it comes to securing press features. It’s unrealistic to expect that your music will capture the attention of major blogs or labels right out of the gate. However, if you take the time to build your relationships from the ground up and align yourself with others who are in the same growth stage as you, I really believe that you can do amazing things and that your career can thrive.

As your band begins to grow and gain notoriety, it’s very possible that the writers you once worked with at a smaller blog will go on to write for larger outlets, or at the very least know someone who does, creating new access and opportunities.

By supporting a site that’s still in its infancy, you’re saying, “I believe in you, and I want to be a part of your journey.” After all, isn’t that what you want blogs to feel about you and your music? The more you embrace growing together, the more successful you’ll find yourself.

Still don’t believe us? Here’s why small outlets will do more for your music than big ones.

Angela Mastrogiacomo is a music enthusiast and the founder and CEO of Muddy Paw PRand Infectious Magazine. You can find hanging out with her dog, eating sweets, and curled up with a good book.

Via Sonicbids

Read more from the source: http://www.musicthinktank.com/blog/4-reasons-why-you-should-focus-on-small-music-blogsnot-big-o.html

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‘True To Self’ Album Review: Bryson Tiller Shifts His Focus On Production

Bryson Tiller debuted his sophomore LP “True To Self” (May. 26) nearly a month early. Was it better than “TrapSoul?” Let me explain.

Read more from the source: http://www.musictimes.com/articles/75480/20170621/bryson-tiller-true-to-self-album-review-trapsoul.htm

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Mohican Sun – Providence

By Maja C

Mysterious tribal outfit Mohican Sun return with hypnotic rhythm of Providence, out now on the Fixate EP on Integral. Get it here.

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Turno’s Hardware Essentials

By dave

Between August 2-6, a massive chunk of the drum & bass industry will be temporarily located in Prague for Beats Evolution Conference (BEC) and Let It Roll. Two days of hands-on industry insight, workshops, talks, and opportunities for aspiring artists such as meet and greets and demo listening sessions. Followed by three days of beats at the biggest drum & bass festival on the planet. It’s the most comprehensive and exciting gathering on the drum & bass calendar.

Turno’s one of the many artists who’ll be present in Prague during this time. Not only will he be making his debut at Let It Roll but he’s also locked in to host a masterclass at BEC… Which definitely isn’t a debut. In the last few years Turno’s developed a fine line in tutoring as one of the aspects of his Time Is Now brand. He’s the perfect man for the job although he’s the first to admit he never planned to become a teacher.

“I was hearing a lot of under-produced tracks that had real potential so I put a lifeline out there and said I’d help people just get that extra bit of production to their tracks,” he explains. “It was more successful than I thought. I’m now having to book time off for Turno or I’ll be a full time tutor. But it’s one of the best decisions I’ve made. You meet some lovely people and it’s amazing to see their development. I think it’s nice to have someone to answer questions no matter how big or small they are. We’ve all been there at the start of our studio journey and wanted to ask artists questions but can’t because we don’t know them on that level so I’ve mentored a lot of these guys and they can hit me up any time.”

Now five years into his own studio journey, Turno’s own production game continues to accelerate. The last 18 months has seen the Bedford-based producer dent discographies on a commendably broad range of imprints; obviously there’s been the ubiquitous Invaderz on Charge, one of the most heavily played tunes of the year so far, but he’s also appeared on Viper with North Base and, last year, appeared on Playaz and Titan. Not to mention his frequent appearances on Low Down Deep and a few cheeky grime bangers and D&B bootlegs of house tracks he’s thrown down in between.

But as broad as his body of work is becoming, there’s one consistency in how he approaches his production. Whether it’s his flighty, soulful rolling take on Jean Jaques Smoothie or his face-melting Frightened, one thing is certain: hardware will be involved.

“It’s an addiction,” he admits. “Once you’ve had a taste of it you’ll want to start collecting things and trying things out. It’s great to explore and try things differently. If everyone’s using the same synths and same VSTs it’s more important than ever to be using these tools.”

Keen to point out hardware doesn’t have to be daunting or hugely expensive, Turno recommends a small selection of tools that not only help to find your own sound but also encourage experimentation, human articulation and essential time away from the screen.

“It’s all about keeping an open mind,” he explains. “It’s what I say to every student I have. Try not to get stuck in set ways or think things must be done in a certain way. Little pieces of hardware and time away from staring at the screen can really help you break out of set ways of thinking.”

Here are three ways Turno breaks out of his own set ways of thinking…

TL Audio Fatman 2

A valve compressor I’ve been using for five years. I run breaks through it, kicks, snares, basses sometimes. Anything I want to put a spin on, I find it gives a nice industrial sound. You have to be careful not to use too much of it, you can ruin the sound but it’s got that analogue character you just can’t get digitally. You can get some fairly decent software compressors but nothing can replace a valve. It makes it warm but gives it a crunch. Anyone who uses analog will the say the same thing; there’s something about hardware that can’t be replicated. Plus it’s nice to take yourself from the screen and get properly hands on and experiment.

Korg Volca Series

Very cheap and fun to use. I’ve got the beats and bass ones. The beats one is like a TR8 mini Roland with kick, clap, sequencer and you can pitch the notes, decays and envelopes. It’s another hands-on tool to take you away from the screen and have some hands-on creative time. Just see what you come up with, then when you’re happy with the sound, record them in. It’s the same with the bass one. It’s got a nice and warm sound and really simple to use. These things are pick up and play. The filter on the bass is really smooth and has a really nice slope resonance with some great sweet spots.

I find myself recording sessions of me playing around and you get some nice articulations with your hands which you can never get with automation. It’s about bringing a personal touch and an originality. They’re a nice introduction to hardware, too. Not expensive, basic and helps you understand how to incorporate hardware into your workflow and process. It’s a lot less daunting than sitting in front of a massive synth with 50 oscillators.

Allen & Heath Mix Wizard

This is quite an old model mixing desk but it’s got such a nice sound, a great five-band EQ and a really nice driver. If I’m using any hardware then I run it through this because the sound of the desk complements it so nicely. When I use the Fatman on breaks, for example, and I find there’s a snare or an element that’s a little thin or not quite sounding right, I’ll use the EQ on this to sculpt or boost them. You can’t go wrong with a hardware EQ if the module you’re using is right.

Not everything goes through the desk, it’s outboard and I assign whatever I want to a channel so it doesn’t affect my original signal. Again it’s about having less screen time, more hands on time and encouraging experimenting. It all works in harmony together.

Work in harmony with Turno August 2 – 3 @ Beats Evolution Conference: Tickets & Info

Follow Turno: Soundcloud / Twitter / Facebook / Insta / Time Is Now

The post Turno’s Hardware Essentials appeared first on Drum&BassArena.

Read more from the source: https://breakbeat.co.uk/interviews/turnos-hardware-essentials/

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Survival – Time Flux

By Maja C

Another hench production from certified badman & MasterChef finalist Survival, taken from his forthcoming album on Dispatch. Get the sampler here.

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L-Side – Love Vibration (ft. Ras Tweed)

By Maja C

Sonic seduction courtesy of L-Side & Ras Tweed, forthcoming on V Recordings. Pre-order it here.

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Read more from the source: https://breakbeat.co.uk/news/l-side-love-vibration-ras-tweed/

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